Aug 142010
 

Ok, final bits for the progress on the kit and now she’s done. As stated in my previous post, I sprayed the final gloss clear over the parts that morning so that when I got off work, I can get down to applying the panel lines. So I did just that when I got home. The panel lines are done with tamiya enamel black thinned with rosonol lighter fluid. The whole job looks rather messy, but the wash solution is left on the surface to dry for a couple of hours. Angel and I had our little mandate and hit up the local stop for the Kogi Truck that night, then headed off to see The Expendables It was decent as an action movie, cheesy lines, a few finny ones, and decent action; not much to write home about.

A few hours later, the wash solution has dried enough that it’s very simple to wipe away the excess ink using a q-tip and paper towels moistened with lighter fluid.

After wiping everything down, the parts are sprayed with the final flat clear coat and then let to dry and cure over night. Waking up this morning, I got down to the final gluing and assembly of all the parts.

Gator needs his GAT!

And on to the final assembly. Now a little trick I use to avoid the pesky problems of paint scratching while assembling, posing, and positioning the kit is to slide some note card paper into the areas that are prone to rubbing together. This way, I can continue to move and reposition the kit until I find the one I like, without having any paint scratching problems. Once I find the pose and position I like, the note card papers come out, and the surface of the parts are unscathed.

Completed pictures after the jump…

And with that, she’s done.

And now for some close up shots. This kit is definitely menacing when posed correctly.

Random close up pictures:

All the completed pictures are here: http://gamerabaenre.com/gouf_conv.htm
Complete build progression is here: http://gamerabaenre.com/gouf_conv_prog.htm

  10 Responses to “Gouf Custom Conversion DONE!”

  1. so good! i really enjoyed this build process. definitely a lot that i can learn from you. thanks

  2. Great stuff. I haven’t done anything but snapping for the last two months. Seeing this, I’m going to get my butt back to painting tomorrow!

    By the way, would add my site to your blogroll? Thanks.

  3. So…. so much win! I’ve always liked the way you take one look at the line b/w realism and stylism and decide that maybe the line shouldn’t be so straight and narrow after all!

    Wonderful build all around! The dichotomy of the dark shading/palette and the stylish panel lines and decorative dark blue highlights is simply spectacular too look at!

  4. HAHA.. thanks, glad you liked the kit.

    Question, are there any cool gunpla shops in Toronto? I’ll be up there the second week of September, kinda want to see if there’s anything decent I can pick up that I cannot find locally.

  5. 1 question… how did u get rid of the bleach marks? when i used masking tapes, i always get bleach marks. can’t seem to get rid of them.

  6. Bleach marks? What kind of masking tape are you using? I’m using mostly tamiya masking tape and the stuff is very low tack so there is very little to no residue left over.

  7. actually, i think it is called bleed and not bleach. i was using the white masking tapes. i’ve never came across a tamiya masking tape before, but i was actually shopping around for the blue painter’s masking tape to try out. can’t seem to find any in my local hardware store. i have to try art shops.

    but i have been boring through the contents in your site, and i have got a lot of ideas.

  8. Yeah, I recommend finding tamiya masking tape. Tamiya masking tape is thin and adheres to the surface. The bleeding comes from the tape being too thick and not getting a full seal on the part. Blue painters masking tape is a little too thick and you may still get bleeding there as well.

    Call up your local model shops and see if they carry tamiya masking tape. If not, you can always try finding the stuff from an online source.

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