Aug 012016
 

I’m revisiting this project as I plan on taking this sucker to Otakon. When I was working on the project, I haphazardly added some tiny little thrusters to the end of the hammer. Even at the time, it didn’t quite look right to me, but it didn’t really hit me until I was working on the Hi Nu project. Below are pictures I originally took of the Gusion with the hammer and tiny thrusters. You cannot even see them at certain angles.

This was sort of bothering me when I finished the kit, but I didn’t quite know what was really bothering me. Not until I was working on the Hi Nu project did it come slamming into my brain. There was just too much negative space at the back of the hammer with the little thrusters and they just look completely out of place. I had just replaced some crappy resin thrusters that had come with the kit with some updated resin thrusters that I had casted from molds of new aluminum thrusters I picked up specifically for the Hi Nu project. So the idea was to place bigger thrusters at the back of the hammer.

Since the aluminum thrusters had multiple parts, I just made casts of the separate pieces and used them to create different sized thrusters. I ripped up the original smaller thrusters and planned out a new layout with the new much larger thrusters. Once the plan looked good, I made more copies, cleaned them, primed them, then painted them. Then I glued them into place. Here’s a picture with the difference.

gusion_hammer_redux

I think this is a definite improvement over the wimpy little thrusters. They are beefier and there’s much less negative space at the back of the hammer. Here are some more pictures.

You can always go back to fix things. And no, I’m not fixing the bloody decals 🙂

Apr 252016
 

I learned nothing from my mistake with the 1/144 Gusion, and colossally fucked it all up again with the 1/100. Just look at the shoulders for the 1/100 as well as the 1/144. It’s not the same issue per say, but it’s the same underlying issue that resulted in the problem. But we’ll get to that later.

First, there’s the final bits of detail paint work and the ever-so-fun patience game once all the paint has been sprayed. The first gloss coat needs time to cure. Decal application needs time for the decal softening and setting solutions to work. The second layer of gloss coat needs to cure. The enamel wash needs to be applied – then a bit of time to allow it to partially dry, then the cleanup then letting it sit to fully dry. And the final flat coat and letting that cure. But once the flat coat is done, we’re not quite done yet either. Since there are some detail parts that need attention as well as the final assembly. It’s damn hard fighting the temptation to only wait an hour after the final flat to dry to the touch and just get in and start assembling and gluing final detail bits. The flat coat is like any layer of paint, it needs time to cure. The one hour, dry to the touch ain’t gonna cut it. My impatience has caused horrific accidents at this stage from fingerprints to marred paint. Patience sucks ass; but is a necessary evil.

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Apr 182016
 

It’s been 3 weeks since the last update, so this will be a sizeable progress report for this kit. I’ve finally gotten past the seemingly endless cycle of putty –> sand –> primer; which means some actual color is getting on to the parts. And with painting, there’s always some amount of masking. And for this project, there is a bit of cycling with masking, painting, adding more masking, and continued painting. It’s almost inception level masking with how recursive this process can be; so I guess it’s a good thing I studied computer science. I can laugh at the simplicity of model building after breaking down everything to a basic concept. A function to build which uses glues, plastic, primer, putties, and cycling through the process. Then a function to paint with the masking, painting, and then remasking, and then rework after the mask is removed and problems pop up because of missed masking. But enough of this mindless rambling; on to the actual work.

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